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::: Now Playing :::

~~~~~~~~Upstairs~~~~~~~~


A Most Wanted Man

6:30 each evening*
1:30 matinees Sat & Sun
*No 6:30 show - Tuesday, August 5

Begin Again

8:45 each evening
4:00 matinees Sat & Sun

~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~

A Most Wanted Man

Rated R; 121 minutes


WATCH THE TRAILER

Guy Lodge, HitFix (excerpted)

Anton Corbijn's A Most Wanted Man is the first big-screen adaptation of a John Le Carré novel since Tomas Alfredson's Tinker Tailor Soldier Spy in 2011. The difference is that we're long past the Cold War's big thaw in this particular story: post-9/11 paranoia is the order of the day, though Le Carré's typically dry, rueful tone and director Corbijn's pewter-colored aesthetic combine to suggest the shift is immaterial: the more things change, the more they stay the same, and political distrust springs eternal.

The setting may be Hamburg -- a hub of terrorist research and surveillance since being revealed as the place where Mohammed Atta conceived and planned the 9/11 attacks -- but so dense is the film's fog of smoke, cynicism and heavy skies from the outset that you half-expect Gary Oldman's George Smiley to show up. In a sense, he does, though his accent has turned brittly German and he's taken the rather less trim form of Philip Seymour Hoffman.

Hoffman's performance is a thing of wily, weathered beauty -- his peculiar accent less a feat of mimicry than of character-based interpretation. A slouching figure in unpressed suits, his sparse yellow hair an afterthought, Hoffman plays Gunther Bachmann, the jaded chief of a terrorist investigation unit kept hidden by the German government, their mission is to cultivate and protect informants in the city's Islamic community. Few contemporary actors have quite such a lock on bleary-eyed intelligence, and he plays Bachmann's lone-wolf stature with just the right degree of ashy irony -- his mordantly flirtatious exchanges with Robin Wright's CIA agent Sullivan are a particular joy to observe.

film website

~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~

Begin Again

Rated R; 101 minutes

WATCH THE TRAILER


Leonard Maltin, IndieWire (excerpted)

A sleeper like Once would be a tough act for anyone to follow, but writer-director John Carney’s new musical drama Begin Again stands nicely on its own. It may not feel quite as organic as the 2006 picture that put Carney on the map, but it has a fine cast, good music, and an abundance of charm.

Keira Knightley plays a talented songwriter who has accompanied her boyfriend (Adam Levine) to New York City, where a hit movie soundtrack has launched him on the road to success. Their relationship turns rocky once his career takes off and she winds up singing a song inspired by her heartbreak in a club one night. Down-and-out music producer Mark Ruffalo happens to hear her and becomes convinced that he can make her a star. What’s more, backing her career just might prove to be his salvation.

It might not sound terribly original, but Carney has fleshed out his story with wonderful songs and made exceptional use of the City, from rooftops and alleyways to a subway station. The best scenes in the film have an impromptu feel that’s hard to resist. Carney has elicited spontaneous performances from an experienced cast—just as he did with the nonprofessional stars of Once—and has chosen his actors well. Although not a conventional musical, Begin Again makes you feel good, just as those old movie musicals used to do.

film website

~~~~~~~~Downstairs~~~~~~~~


The Grand Seduction

6:00 each evening*
1:00 matinees Sat & Sun
*No 6:00 show - Wednesday, August 6

A Most Wanted Man

8:30 each evening
3:30 matinees Sat & Sun

~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~

The Grand Seduction

Rated PG-13; 115 minutes

WATCH THE TRAILER


Neil Genzlinger, The New York Times

Ah, those wacky foreigners and their impossibly charming villages. If they’re not posing naked for fund-raising purposes (Calendar Girls), they’re trying to collect a dead man’s lottery winnings (Waking Ned Devine). The latest entry in this tradition is The Grand Seduction, and it’s adorable.

Tickle Head, a down-on-its-luck fishing village in Canada, wants to lure a recycling plant so everyone can get off welfare, but the company requires that the town have a doctor, which it doesn’t. And so the residents, led by Murray (Brendan Gleeson, the perfect anchor for the proceedings), set about trying to persuade a visiting physician (Taylor Kitsch) to settle in Tickle Head.

This involves not only making the town look more appealing than it is but also making it seem to embody all of the doctor’s interests, which are gleaned by eavesdropping on his phone calls. Among other things, residents try to pass themselves off as aficionados of cricket, and the sport may never recover.

The movie, a remake of the French-language film, Seducing Dr. Lewis, has an eclectic supporting cast that includes Mark Critch, Gordon Pinsent and Liane Balaban. Under Don McKellar’s direction, they might have you investigating the possibility of relocating to Tickle Head yourself.

film website

~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~

A Most Wanted Man

Rated R; 121 minutes


WATCH THE TRAILER

Guy Lodge, HitFix (excerpted)

Anton Corbijn's A Most Wanted Man is the first big-screen adaptation of a John Le Carré novel since Tomas Alfredson's Tinker Tailor Soldier Spy in 2011. The difference is that we're long past the Cold War's big thaw in this particular story: post-9/11 paranoia is the order of the day, though Le Carré's typically dry, rueful tone and director Corbijn's pewter-colored aesthetic combine to suggest the shift is immaterial: the more things change, the more they stay the same, and political distrust springs eternal.

The setting may be Hamburg -- a hub of terrorist research and surveillance since being revealed as the place where Mohammed Atta conceived and planned the 9/11 attacks -- but so dense is the film's fog of smoke, cynicism and heavy skies from the outset that you half-expect Gary Oldman's George Smiley to show up. In a sense, he does, though his accent has turned brittly German and he's taken the rather less trim form of Philip Seymour Hoffman.

Hoffman's performance is a thing of wily, weathered beauty -- his peculiar accent less a feat of mimicry than of character-based interpretation. A slouching figure in unpressed suits, his sparse yellow hair an afterthought, Hoffman plays Gunther Bachmann, the jaded chief of a terrorist investigation unit kept hidden by the German government, their mission is to cultivate and protect informants in the city's Islamic community. Few contemporary actors have quite such a lock on bleary-eyed intelligence, and he plays Bachmann's lone-wolf stature with just the right degree of ashy irony -- his mordantly flirtatious exchanges with Robin Wright's CIA agent Sullivan are a particular joy to observe.

film website